IRS Phone Numbers: How To Speak To A Human At The IRS

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We’ve all been there–you need to speak with someone at the IRS about a tax issue, and you’re having a hard time getting an actual human being on the phone. It’s frustrating. We want to help you avoid this annoyance and get your tax solutions quickly. Whether you’re calling the stimulus check phone number or the general IRS phone number, you need a live person.
This guide helps you navigate the different communication channels within the IRS. Soon, you will be speaking to the correct IRS representative for your situation.

Why You Would Need to Call the IRS

According to the IRS, the IRS website should be your first resource for help and information because of the sheer volume of calls. The IRS will not address the following issues on the phone:

  • You have questions about tax law
  • You have transcript requests (unless you call 800-908-9946)
  • You need IRS forms
  • You want to check your refund status, but it’s been less than 21 days since you filed
  • You have complaints about your taxes or tax-related issues

You may want to call the IRS and speak with an actual person if:

  • You received a notice from the IRS (ALWAYS call the number on the notice)
  • You will miss a deadline set by the IRS and need to request more time. For example, extensions for paying off your tax balance, to send more information, or to respond to a notice from the IRS.
  • “Where’s My Refund?” says you need to call
  • You require the amount you need to pay off for tax purposes
  • You have questions about your IRS payment plan (installment agreement)
  • You want to know the status of any IRS action (like a penalty abatement request)
  • You need to confirm that the IRS received your payment
  • You lost, never received, or received an incorrect Form W-2 and/or Form 1099-R

Prepare Yourself

Before you call, make sure you have all of the information that you need. The agent will ask you for some key pieces of information to verify your identity and continue the phone call. They may also need some information on you to help them find a solution. This information includes:

  • Social Security cards and birthdates for all people involved
  • If you don’t have a Social Security card, your Individual Taxpayer Identification Number
  • Filing status (whether you’re single, the head of household, married and filing jointly or married and filing separately)
  • Last year’s tax return to verify your identity
  • A copy of the tax return in question
  • Any letters or notices you received from the IRS

How Can You Speak Directly With An Agent at the IRS?

Here is our secret, multi-step route to getting transferred to an agent within the IRS customer service line. Please note that the IRS may update their system, and this sequence could change accordingly. Remember that this is only one solution out of many for speaking with an actual person at the IRS.

  • Call the IRS telephone number at 1-800-829-1040. This line is open Monday through Friday from 7 AM to 7 PM local time.
  • The automated system will ask you to select your preferred language.
  • Once you’ve set your language, choose option 2 for “Personal Income Tax” instead.
  • Press 1 for “form, tax history, or payment.”
  • Press 3 for all other questions.
  • Press 2 for all other questions.
  • The system will ask you to enter your Social Security number. Make sure you do not enter any numbers at this time.
  • The system will ask you twice, so make sure not to answer. Another menu will prompt you.
  • Press 2 within this menu for individual tax questions.
  • Press 4 for all other questions: the system should finally transfer you to a representative.

Other Ways to Reach a Real Person at the IRS

Visit Your Local IRS Office

The IRS runs local Taxpayer Assistance Center offices in every state. You can’t just show up at a local IRS office any time, but you must make an appointment ahead of time. That IRS number is 844-545-5640.

Give Your Local Taxpayer Advocate Service Center a Call

The Taxpayer Advocate Service is an independent organization within the IRS that helps people with tax problems that they can’t fix by themselves. Every state has at least one Taxpayer Advocate Service center. These centers are independent of the local IRS office and report to the National Taxpayer Advocate Service.

Other IRS Phone Numbers

While you can always call the main IRS number, lesser-known IRS phone numbers could help you get assistance faster. Here’s a list of other IRS phone numbers, categorized by your status or concern, to help you reach the right people who can assist you with your specific situation.

Employment Status

  • Self-employed taxpayers: 800-829-4933

Fraud and Disaster

  • Victims of disaster: 866-562-5227
  • Victims of identity and refund theft (receive a new IP PIN): 800-908-4490
  • Report scams and phishing, confirm the legitimacy of IRS agent: 800-366-4484

Residency or Special Tax Status

  • Taxpayers who live overseas: 267-941-1000
  • Adoption Taxpayer Identification Number application status: 737-800-5511

Refunds, Payments, and Balances

  • Questions about balances: 800-829-0922; 800-829-7650; 800-829-3903
  • Check status of a tax refund: 800-829-1954
  • Check status of a tax refund on hold: 866-897-3315
  • Make a payment using Electronic Federal Tax Payment System: 800-555-4477; 800-244-4829 (Spanish)
  • Verify, pay off, or resolve a tax lien: 800-913-6050
  • Confirm which debts will offset your tax refund: 800-304-3107 (866-297-0517 TTY/TDD)

Types of Taxes

  • Estate and gift tax concerns: 866-699-4083
  • Questions about excise tax: 866-699-4096

Tax Return Issues

  • Check status of an amended tax return: 866-464-2050
  • Report wrong income on a substitute return: 866-681-4271
  • Check if bankruptcy affects your tax debt: 800-973-0424
  • Relief as an Innocent Spouse: 866-681-4271
  • Taxpayer Advocate Service: 877-777-4778
  • International Taxpayer Advocate, English: 787-522-8601
  • International Taxpayer Advocate, Spanish: 787-522-8600

Documents and Transcripts

  • Lost ITIN documents: 800-908-9982
  • Order a tax transcript: 800-908-9946

Accessibility and Local Services

  • For the hearing impaired (TTY/TDD): 800-829-4059
  • Schedule an appointment with a local IRS office: 844-545-5640
  • Request paper tax forms: 800-829-3676
  • Find a free tax clinic close to you: 800-906-9887; 888-227-7669

For Tax Professionals

  • Tax preparers and tax professionals: 800-829-8374
  • Tax preparers and tax professionals with e-filing questions: 866-255-0654
  • Tax practitioner priority service: 866-860-4259
  • Tax professionals overseas: 512-416-7750; 267-941-1000

Corporations, Nonprofits, and Government Entities

  • Corporate taxpayers, partnerships, and nonprofits: 866-255-0654
  • Nonprofits with tax law or filing questions: 877-829-5500
  • Government and tax-exempt entities: 877-829-5500

Employers

  • International businesses that want an Employer Identification Number (EIN): 267-941-1099
  • Domestic employers looking for e-filing tech support: 866-455-7438
  • International employers looking for e-filing tech support: 304-263-8700

Looking for the Stimulus Check Phone Number at the IRS?

There are some great options for finding out information about your stimulus check instead of calling the IRS phone line. The IRS’s purpose-built stimulus check website is an excellent and informative resource if you need to know where your stimulus check is, find out if you’re eligible for one, or check how much you should receive.


The IRS has also created an app called Get My Payment that everyone can use to monitor their stimulus check status. You enter some personal information and can find out whether the government has sent your check. If the government has sent your check, you can even use something called the USPS Informed Delivery tool to obtain notifications regarding your payment’s transit status.


In case you’re wondering, you can call the IRS for help with your stimulus check payments. A representative may be able to answer questions that the IRS website cannot answer. If your question is very specific or the provided online resources can’t help you resolve your issue, there is a phone number you can call for help.


Before calling the phone line, the IRS wants everyone to consult its frequently asked questions page on its website and the Get My Payment tool for information. If these resources can’t answer your questions, you will be able to call the IRS Economic Impact Payment line at 800-919-9835.


Remember that an automated recording will try to help you before you’re connected with an actual representative, so make sure to have your questions and basic personal information ready for identity confirmation.


Previously, the IRS phone lines were simply not equipped to handle the enormous amount of inquiries created by the stimulus check programs. The IRS has added thousands of phone representatives to answer common questions about Economic Impact Payments, which is the official term for the $1,200 recovery checks provided by the CARES Act.


This is excellent news for any and every American concerned about their stimulus checks, no matter the reason. While millions of payments have successfully gone out so far, there have been many complaints.
Online reports of stimulus checks issued in wrong amounts and with dependents missing are common. Others have reported their checks going to the wrong bank accounts or even benefiting deceased taxpayers.


At the end of the day, there are many ways you can reach a person at the IRS to help you with your specific concerns. Depending on your situation, you may have a specific number that you can call. If not, our tips and tricks should help you get the human support you need to resolve your tax and IRS issues quickly.